Read e-book The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg Book 1)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg Book 1) book. Happy reading The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg Book 1) Pocket Guide.

Agnete Friis Goodreads Author. The Boy in the Suitcase Nina Borg, 1 3. When her estranged friend Karin leaves her a key to a public locker in the Copenhagen train station, Nina gets suckered into her most dangerous project yet. Inside the locker is a suitcase, and inside the suitcase is a three-year-old boy: Is the boy a victim of child trafficking? Can he be turned over to authorities, or will they only return him to whoever sold him? In an increasingly desperate trek across Denmark, Nina tries to figure out who the boy is, where he belongs, and who exactly is trying to hunt him down.

Hardcover , pages.

The Border Lords Charlie Hood Novel

Published November 8th by Soho Crime first published Copenhagen Denmark Vilnius Lithuania. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Boy in the Suitcase , please sign up. This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [There was one thing I didn't understand in this book. Towards the end Morten goes home and he realizes something has happened.

There is blood and pee on his kitchen floor. He follows a sobbing sound to his bathroom and finds a woman sitting on the lid of his toilet. He asks her, "Where is Nina? Everything is all over. Who was that woman and how did she know to go there? LeAnne This answer contains spoilers… view spoiler [ She is the blonde woman who kidnapped the boy and rode to Nina's with her steroid-raged boyfriend. Although she isn't above prostitution, blackmail, …more She is the blonde woman who kidnapped the boy and rode to Nina's with her steroid-raged boyfriend.

Although she isn't above prostitution, blackmail, or stealing a child for ransom, she couldn't handle going along with him after she saw him beat Nina. Can this book stand alone or do you have to read the entire series? LeAnne You can absolutely read this as a stand alone.

You could do the same with the others, however Nina has some quirks about her personality that are …more You can absolutely read this as a stand alone. You could do the same with the others, however Nina has some quirks about her personality that are hinted at throughout and then explained near the end of "Suitcase. See all 6 questions about The Boy in the Suitcase…. Lists with This Book. Aug 19, Aubrey rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: First I have to saywhat a tremendous book! I don't usually read thrillersI usually find them too stressful to read on top of everything else I have to deal with in lifeand also the title threw me off initially because reading about atrocities done to children is not something I want to read about if the last bit throws you off too, take it from me as someone who can't read that sort of stuff, you will be surprised when you open this book what it actually turns out to beI can't say m First I have to saywhat a tremendous book!

I don't usually read thrillersI usually find them too stressful to read on top of everything else I have to deal with in lifeand also the title threw me off initially because reading about atrocities done to children is not something I want to read about if the last bit throws you off too, take it from me as someone who can't read that sort of stuff, you will be surprised when you open this book what it actually turns out to beI can't say more than that without giving anything away but this book had gotten a lot of buzz the NYTimes wrote a very positive review but be warned it also includes lots of spoilers: All that being said it has been a long time since a book has kept me up several hours after I should have been asleep on a work night and this one certainly did that!

I roared through this book! So, what I liked about it: They are not stupid or vapidthey are strong and intelligentof course they have flaws but their flaws make them supremely interesting and truly make you care about them. They also compel the reader to keep reading to see what decisions these women will make nextthey are unpredictable while at the same time they feel like women you might know or might have met at one time or another. I would recommend this to people looking for a great thrillerI would also recommend this to anyone who likes to read books involving strong female characters.

This recommendation would be made to 2 separate groups. I could definitely see this book being made into an incredible film. I will buy a copy for my boyfriend's Mom who likes thrillersI think she will love this one. View all 7 comments. Apr 17, Doreen rated it liked it. A three-year old Lithuanian boy is kidnapped;his single mother tries desperately to find him. Meanwhile, in Denmark, a nurse named Nina Borg finds him in a suitcase and sets out to find his family. Will mother and child be reunited? The point of view skips between various characters and countries. The effect is to create suspense: The multiple perspectives also humanize the characters, even the villains.

My problem with the book is the character A three-year old Lithuanian boy is kidnapped;his single mother tries desperately to find him. My problem with the book is the character Nina Borg. She is a nurse who works helping refugees and immigrants; in fact, she is totally obsessed with helping people, to the point that her own family is neglected. Towards the end of the book there is a reference to a childhood trauma which is supposed to explain her compulsion to help people.

Withholding this information until the end is manipulative and the event described provides insufficient motivation, especially for Nina's indifference to her husband and children. Furthermore, some of Nina's behaviour is unrealistic. She has a great reluctance to contact the police, a reluctance that is not understandable since she would have a great deal of credibility with authorities. Having a major character make illogical decisions so that she endangers herself and others is manipulative plotting. Apparently this is the first in a series featuring Nina Borg, but she is not a strong enough character to entice me to read future books.

Please check out my blog http: View all 4 comments. Jul 04, Britany rated it really liked it Shelves: Could you imagine opening a suitcase and finding a tiny little boy inside? What would you do? I really enjoyed this one. It's been at the top of my tbr for what feels like forever, and I can finally replace it with another older book that I haven't gotten to yet. Nina Borg- a red cross nurse in Denmark gets sucked into an ill advised plan when she opens the locker containing the aforementioned suitcase.

This one moved at a pretty fast pace, and rotated between the cast of characters narrating the Could you imagine opening a suitcase and finding a tiny little boy inside? This one moved at a pretty fast pace, and rotated between the cast of characters narrating the different chapters. At times, it was hard to follow and figure out who was speaking and who was who. I got into a great rhythm and towards the end couldn't stop listening to see how it would all enfold. It came together and for me, wasn't too far fetched of a storyline for me to believe.

Looking forward to the next one in the series. View all 9 comments. Apr 25, Mathura rated it liked it. I liked the story line but that's about it. I don't think it was executed well enough for my tastes or maybe I am judging this book rather harshly after just reading two great books. This is a list of problems I had with this book: Other than the title and the first page of the book everything else was a bore.

Sep 23, Miamikel SS rated it it was amazing. Remember "it was a dark and stormy night I wanted to know - what boy? Why was he in a suitcase?

What is Kobo Super Points?

This book is John Hart meets Stieg Larsson! Even though this book started out a bit confusing - the characters are jumbled together and introduced a little haphazardly, I found that part of the intrique! It does st Remember "it was a dark and stormy night It does start to flow once it gets going and the characters all mesh together in the way the author, I think, intended.


  • Evolutionary Naturalism: Selected Essays.
  • The Artistry of Fundamentals for Band, B-flat Clarinet.
  • Reward Yourself?
  • The Boy in the Suitcase & Invisible Murder: Books 1 and 2 of the Nina Borg Series;

I LOVED the fact that it's an international book - based in a Danish setting with the richness of the area and people so descriptive in this tale. When Nina, a nurse and working at a Copenhagen center for social services, agrees to do a favor for a friends, she is shocked to see the suitcase she is sent to get has a small 3 year old Lithuianian child inside, stolen from his mother. They can't speak to each other, adding to the mystery. Some of the characters made my skin crawl I heard this is a new series 'to-be' - I sure hope so!

Nov 11, Lyn rated it liked it. Neither a police detective nor a prosecutor, Nina is a Red Cross nurse working in a welfare clinic, down in the trenches dealing with domestic violence and substance abuse. I liked her and I was digging how Kaaberbol put this unique but contextually understandable protagonist and crime situation together. Fast moving and empathetic, Kaaberbol has created in this book a likeable hero we can get behind and a realistic crime fiction that grabs the reader from the first few pages. I very much enjoyed this but can see where someone would LOVE this writing. Mar 13, Becky rated it really liked it Shelves: This is just what I needed right now.

I've been in such a reading slump that I feel like everything that I've tried to read has just dragged on forever. I don't know if it's the new job or what, but it's been making me crazy to feel like I've been going through the motions of reading without actually feeling or caring about most of what I've read. There've been exceptions, but it's mostly just been a slog of book after book that I just want to be done with so I can try something else. So this wa This is just what I needed right now.

So this was a welcome change.

‘The Boy in the Suitcase,’ by Lene Kaaberbol and Agnete Friis

Almost from the very beginning of this book, I was hooked and definitely invested. I've come to realize that I really like crime thrillers from this region of Northern Europe. It's gritty in a way that I love, and dark in a way that I dread but secretly love. This is Nina Borg's series, so Nina Borg will be in it, and therefore she can't die in the first book, and therefore I wasn't as concerned for her well-being as I would have liked to have been.

Contrast that to Steig Larsson's Millennium series. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series. Yeah, I know it's not crime - I'm making a point here. Because these series titles didn't hint that any particular character s were central to the overall story arc, I was on the edge of my fucking seat when the characters were in danger, because I couldn't rely on them being the center of the story's universe and thus have to make it into subsequent books. GRRM kills off people when he gets tired of typing their names in his manuscripts, so nobody is safe I want to have my heart in my throat when I read because I want to care about what happens to the characters and I want to feel that it's real.

And I got that here But there were a lot of things that I loved about this book, so don't let that mini-bitchfit turn you away. This book has great characters, and one of most believably flawed main characters I've read in a long time. I was going to devote a good chunk of this paragraph to talking about Nina, but then I decided against it.

Because me talking about her flaws seems to be simplifying them, and it's not really doing justice to the character that has been created here. She is nuanced and And the way that her character is revealed to us is fantastic as well, because it's not just infodumped onto our heads in the beginning. What we learn about Nina comes from the whole of the book, in tiny little smidges of hints that must be tacked on to the small pile that we've picked up already, until gradually a shape starts to take place.

I say this because my perspective on Nina's family changed about a dozen times during the reading of this book. In the beginning, we see Nina trying to help a co-worker avoid her sexually abusive fiance unsuccessfully , and then right away we're treated to our first impression of Nina's husband, Morton.

Not sure on the spelling - audio. Nina's husband is painted in rough strokes as an overbearing control freak who has to speak slowly and condescendingly to make sure that Nina can comprehend. Lunch for their son is to be a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, no crusts, Superman lunchbox.

Do you think you got that, or should I write it down? I was immediately turned off and immediately disliked him. Especially in light of what I could tell of Nina at that point, a strong, independent woman who isn't afraid of standing up to a man who is hurting her friend. And in the end, I came to really respect Morton for his patience and understanding and almost saint-like forgiveness. And that's just the background.

The main plot of the story was great as well, and kept me on my toes to know what would happen. The main antagonist, Yuchas spelling? Not because he was an intensely violent and unscrupulous man, but because he chose to be that way as a means to an end for his dream of being a normal family man. I could see the desire to be good and normal and happy, but the way that he decided to bring that about was to be completely the opposite.

I think that he disturbed me so much more because I have a soft spot for big bearlike thugs who, underneath, are really gentle and kind. And I could see that in him, or the potential to be that, and he decided to reject any kindness and just rage and not think or take control of oneself or responsibility. The main story revolves around a little boy who was kidnapped, and man, this storyline was heartbreaking - especially from his mother's perspective.

I felt for her so much. Her fear and dread and helplessness and anger were all crystal clear and expertly shown. The reader gets to see both what's really happening to her little boy and her fears of what's happening to him, and I couldn't help trying to mentally send her status updates on him because her emotional distress was real to me.

I'm not sure if that's completely due to how she was written, or because I have a superactive empathy gland I would have liked a little more closure with Sigita at the end, and maybe a little more about her life and employer. Her job seems to almost parallel that of Karin's Maybe there will be more about her in subsequent books.

See a Problem?

Ok, so all that's about the story itself, which I really enjoyed, but I need to talk about the audio now. I have very mixed feelings about the reader of this book. One the one hand, I really appreciate being able to hear the Danish names pronounced and hear the accents The reader has a tendency to get extremely animated and loud and excitable during action scenes, and the end result is that, rather than letting the story speak for itself, it feels like she's forcing a reaction down my throat.

I can almost picture her leaning forward, eyes wide, hands clutched, heart racing as she reads I probably will continue the series at some point, but I likely won't go for the audio again. View all 5 comments. Hooked me from the beginning. The Danish bourgeoisie and the criminal underworld collide in a moving, fast-paced thriller with psychological depth. Nina Borg is one of my new favorite heroines!

‘The Boy in the Suitcase,’ by Lene Kaaberbol and Agnete Friis - The Washington Post

Nina is all heart and her efforts to bring justice to women like Natasha are heroic. Also in A Nina Borg Novel. Also by Lene Kaaberbol , Agnete Friis. See all books by Lene Kaaberbol , Agnete Friis. Inspired by Your Browsing History. The Line That Held Us. The Price You Pay. The Weight of this World. Item s unavailable for purchase. Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping.

Chi ama i libri sceglie Kobo e inMondadori. Buy the eBook Price: Available in Russia Shop from Russia to buy this item. Or, get it for Kobo Super Points! In this series Book 2. Ratings and Reviews 4 59 star ratings 4 reviews. Yes No Thanks for your feedback! One of those stories with at first seemingly unconnected ghreads that eventually draw to a tight satisfying conclusion.

Good scandi thriller,easy to read and held interest enough to keep you wanting to turn the page. Not too heavy and easy to do in bite sized chunks. Very good read wanted to keep ready need book 2 so can still follow what happens to boy and 1st born if he gets a kidney and lives … Show more Show less. A great suspenseful read!! Each page better than the next!!

Related Articles

How to write a great review Do Say what you liked best and least Describe the author's style Explain the rating you gave Don't Use rude and profane language Include any personal information Mention spoilers or the book's price Recap the plot.